Above Average Spring Brings Beautiful Blooms to Boise

Oh my, Spring is here in the Intermountain West! The lovely – and more than typical rain in March has lead to some lovely April blooms.  The absence of heavy frosts and daily wind has been heavenly!  In fact, I’ll venture to say it has been an above average Spring for gardeners!

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It is easy to tell that tulips are one of my favorite spring flowers.  I have a couple of different types and several varieties around my garden.  I like to combine tulips with interesting plant textures.  The idea being the “texture” plant will still be around after the tulip is gone and in some cases will help hide the dying tulip foliage.

Here is a shot of mixed purples in a front garden.  Darwin hybrid tulip ‘Purple Prince’ is combined with aubretia and moss phlox (phlox subulata) along with the foliage of hardy geranium maculatum ‘Espresso.’

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Pulsatilla patens (above) is another “purple” residing nearby,

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Aubretia is a great low-growing spring bloomer that does very well in our local (Boise valley) area.  It is not picky about the pH of the soil it grows in and can take a low moisture environment.  It accommodates full sun or part sun, but the best thing is the gorgeous color that lasts 3-5 weeks in the spring.  Look at it up close and personal… now how can you resist this plant?

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Another combination is Tulip ‘Hakuun’ with Calamagrostis x acutiflora  ‘Overdam.’  This grass starts with variegated foliage in the spring when it begins to grow.  I like the white tulip with the variegated foliage.

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My favorite tulips are these that I picked up on a whim at a Target when I first started this garden.Pt3

They are bigger and better every year.  Odd for hybrid tulips, eh?  My theory is they must love this spot where the soil is mounded 2-3 feet above street level. I have combined them with a dwarf globe blue spruce (Picea pungent ‘Globosa’) 

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A different angle with a gold-leafed barberry behind them.

SB07Moving to the back garden, I have tulip ‘Orange Queen’ in bloom with cushion spurge (euphorbia polychroma) and creeping veronica speedwell ‘Georgia Blue’  (veronica penduncularis and Calamagrostis x acutiflora  ‘Overdam’ nearby.

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I have repeated this vignette throughout my main perennial border as I love the bright colors.  Living under a big, bright sky, you must have bold colors!

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Here is a shot of a tangerine Geum (Avens) blooming near the ‘Orange Queen.’

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I also like the ‘Orange Queens’ beside the Himalayan birch (betula utilis ‘Jacquemontii’) with the golden foliage of an unknown Aquilegia.

SB13Now for a different type of tulip, this is tulip greigii ‘Fur Elise.’  It blooms quite early and I love the soft colors and also that it naturalizes providing more blooms as years go by.  I have this combined with Thuja occidentalis ‘Rheingold’ for a sort-of soft earth-tone combination.

fl1 SB14My last combination is another Darwin hybrid tulip that I do not know the name of due to bad record keeping…  The gray/green foliage of cerastium tomentosum (Snow-in-summer) is directly behind the tulips.

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And just for fun, a couple of other pretty bloomers  – hellebore ‘Blue Lady’ and Euphorbia polychroma ‘Bonfire.’

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How about you? Have the Spring growing conditions been above average, average or below average?  If you grow tulips, how do you use them in the garden?

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